JustUsBoys.com gay porn forum

logo

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 50 of 65
  1. #1
    Chief Meteorologist
    jdcnow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Dallas-Fort Worth
    Gender
    Male
    Orientation
    Gay
    Status
    Single
    Posts
    5,789
    Blog Entries
    12

    Code of Conduct

    A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    May I help you? There are very serious and very real business operations problems at Walmart. Has the world's largest retailer finally gotten too big for its britches? You ever notice how when you go into a Walmart, the shelves are always half-empty, and there's hardly a soul in the place to help you? Yesterday, Bloomberg News published a very revealing look at exactly why. In a word >> Management.

    Good evening, everyone. I hope you're doing well, tonight.

    Bloomberg News >> Customers Flee Wal-Mart Empty Shelves for Target, Costco

    Margaret Hancock has long considered the local Wal-Mart Stores Inc. (WMT) superstore her one- stop shopping destination. No longer.

    During recent visits, the retired accountant from Newark, Delaware, says she failed to find more than a dozen basic items, including certain types of face cream, cold medicine, bandages, mouthwash, hangers, lamps and fabrics.

    The cosmetics section “looked like someone raided it,” said Hancock, 63.

    Wal-Mart’s loss was a gain for Kohl’s Corp. (KSS), Safeway Inc. (SWY), Target Corp. (TGT) and Walgreen Co. (WAG) -- the chains Hancock hit for the items she couldn’t find at Wal-Mart.

    “If it’s not on the shelf, I can’t buy it,” she said. “You hate to see a company self-destruct, but there are other places to go.”

    It’s not as though the merchandise isn’t there. It’s piling up in aisles and in the back of stores because Wal-Mart doesn’t have enough bodies to restock the shelves, according to interviews with store workers. In the past five years, the world’s largest retailer added 455 U.S. Wal-Mart stores, a 13 percent increase, according to filings and the company’s website. In the same period, its total U.S. workforce, which includes Sam’s Club employees, dropped by about 20,000, or 1.4 percent. Wal-Mart employs about 1.4 million U.S. workers.

    Disorganized Stores

    A thinly spread workforce has other consequences: Longer check-out lines, less help with electronics and jewelry and more disorganized stores, according to Hancock, other shoppers and store workers. Last month, Wal-Mart placed last among department and discount stores in the American Customer Satisfaction Index, the sixth year in a row the company had either tied or taken the last spot. The dwindling level of customer service comes as Wal- Mart (WMT) has touted its in-store experience to lure shoppers and counter rival Amazon.com Inc.

    Wal-Mart (WMT) traded at a 1.4 percent discount to Target last week on a price-to-earnings basis after averaging a 5.9 percent premium to its smaller rival in the past two years. Wal-Mart traded as high as a 22 percent premium to Target in January 2012. Wal-Mart fell 0.1 percent to $74.77 at the close in New York.

    “Our in stock levels are up significantly in the last few years, so the premise of this story, which is based on the comments of a handful of people, is inaccurate and not representative of what is happening in our stores across the country,” Brooke Buchanan, a Wal-Mart spokeswoman, said in an e-mailed statement. “Two-thirds of Americans shop in our stores each month because they know they can find the products they are looking for at low prices.”

    ‘Getting Worse’

    Last month, Bloomberg News reported that Wal-Mart was “getting worse” at stocking shelves, according to minutes of an officers’ meeting. An executive vice president had been appointed to work on the restocking issue, according to the document.

    At the supercenter across the street from Wal-Mart’s Bentonville, Arkansas, home office, salespeople on March 14 handed out samples of Chobani yogurt and Clif Bars. Thirteen of 20 registers were manned -- with no lines -- and the shelves were fully stocked.

    Three days earlier, about 10 people waited in a customer service line at a Wal-Mart in Secaucus, New Jersey, across the Hudson River from New York, the nation’s largest city. Twelve of 30 registers were open and the lines were about five deep. There were empty spaces on shelves large enough for a grown man to lie down, and a woman wandered around vainly seeking a frying pan.

    Wal-Mart’s restocking challenge coincides with slowing sales growth. Same-store sales in the U.S. for the 13 weeks ending April 26 will be little changed, Bill Simon, the company’s U.S. chief executive officer, said in a Feb. 21 earnings call.

    Target Premium

    “When times were good and people were still shopping, the lack of excellence was OK,” said Zeynep Ton, a retail researcher and associate professor of operations management at the MIT Sloan School of Management in Cambridge, Massachusetts. “Their view has been that they have the lowest prices so customers keep coming anyway. You don’t see that so much anymore.”

    Shoppers are “so sick of this,” said Ton, whose research, published in Harvard Business Review, examines how retailers benefit from offering good wages and benefits to all employees. “They’re mad about the way they were treated or how much time they wasted looking for items that aren’t there.”

    Retailers consider labor -- usually their largest controllable expense -- an easy cost-cutting target, Ton said. That’s what happened at Home Depot Inc. (HD) in the early 2000s, when Robert Nardelli, then chief executive officer, cut staffing levels and increased the percentage of part-time workers to trim expenses and boost profit. Eventually, customer service and customer satisfaction deteriorated and same-store sales growth dropped, Ton said.

    ‘Too Expensive’

    “When you tell retailers they have to invest in people, the typical response is: ‘It’s just too expensive,’” Ton said.

    Adding five full-time employees to Wal-Mart’s (WMT) U.S. supercenters and discount stores would add about a half- percentage point to selling, general and administrative expenses, according to an analysis by Poonam Goyal, a Bloomberg Industries senior analyst based in Skillman, New Jersey. Assuming the workers earned the federal minimum wage and industry standards for health benefits, the added costs would amount to about $448 million a year, she said. In the year ended Jan. 31, Wal-Mart generated $17 billion in profit on revenue of $469.2 billion.

    Barren Landscape

    At the Kenosha, Wisconsin, Wal-Mart where Mary Pat Tifft has worked for nearly a quarter-century, merchandise ready for the sales floor remains on pallets and in steel bins lining the floor of the back room -- an area so full that “no passable aisles” remain, she said. Meanwhile, the front of the store is increasingly barren, Tifft said. That landscape has worsened over the past several years as workers who leave aren’t replaced, she said.

    “There’s a lot of voids out there, a lot of voids,” said Tifft, 58, who oversees grocery deliveries and is a member of OUR Walmart, a union-backed group seeking to improve working conditions at the discount chain. “Customers come in, they can’t find what they’re looking for, and they’re leaving.”

    Years ago, supervisors drilled a message into employees’ heads: “In the door and to the floor,” Tifft said. That mantra now seems impossible to execute.

    ‘No Manpower’

    “There’s no manpower in the store to get the merchandise moving,” she said.

    At the Wal-Mart store in Erie, Pennsylvania, 26-year-old meat and dairy stocker Anthony Falletta faces a similar predicament.

    “The merchandise is in the store, it just can’t make the jump from the shelf in the back to the one in the front,” said Falletta, who works the second shift. “There’s not the people to do it.”

    In both stores, departments have merged, leaving some areas with limited or no staff coverage, they said, and workers rarely have time to finish all their tasks by the end of the day. In the morning, employees scramble to set out new merchandise, put returns back on shelves and handle customer inquires, they said.

    “There is definitely some links broken in the chain, and I don’t know how long they’re going to go on like this,” Tifft said.

    Vicious Cycle

    Wal-Mart is entangled in what Ton calls the “vicious cycle” of under-staffing. Too few workers leads to operational problems. Those problems lead to poor store sales, which lead to lower labor budgets.

    “It requires a wake-up call at a higher level,” she said of the decision to hire more workers.

    Falletta, the meat and dairy stocker in Erie, said his weekly hours are unpredictable. He would like to work a full 40 hours and sometimes gets only 25. Falletta and others interviewed for this story said management bonuses are based partly on minimizing store payroll.

    According to Rochelle Jackson, who works at the jewelry counter at a store in Springfield, Missouri, a supervisor recently explained the number of hours available to schedule employees corresponds to sales performance: The worse the sales number, the fewer hours available.

    “We’re not getting as many sales because there’s simply no one to help the customers throughout the stores,” said Jackson, 24, who has worked at two Wal-Mart stores since 2009. “I asked, ‘Why can’t we have enough hours to make the store work?’ They said, ‘It’s orders from Home Office,’” she said.

    Cutting Hours

    Jackson said her store began cutting hours a year ago, adding that “it hasn’t been really bad until this year.”

    Staff shortages at cash registers during peak hours require Jackson and her co-workers on the sales floor to check shoppers out “while we are trying to restock the shelves, help customers and do other assigned projects,” she said. The so-called Code 7 to the registers leaves a vacuum across the store’s departments, she said.

    Customers looking for groceries ask salespeople in the shoe department for help because they can’t find what they’re looking for, Jackson said.

    In the fall, Tim White, a 36-year-old attorney, tried to buy wall paint at the Wal-Mart near his home in Santee, California.

    “You wait 20, 25 minutes for someone to help you, then the person was not trained on mixing paint,” White said. “It was like, you have to help them help you.”

    ‘Maddening Inability’

    White, who has six children, said while long checkout lines irritated him, “the number-one reason we gave up on Wal-Mart was its prolonged, horrible, maddening inability to keep items in stock.”

    The store would go weeks without products he wanted to buy, such as men’s dress shirts, which he found only in very large or small sizes and unpopular colors, he said.

    “Pretty soon, they were even out of those,” White said. “I would literally check every so often at different Wal-Marts. They would go two or three months with the shelves looking exactly the same.”

    When Wal-Mart was out of stock of his preferred types of shaving lotion or razors, White would “drive next door to Target where they had it in stock all the time,” he said.

    The White family’s visits to Wal-Mart -- which had been a several times a week occurrence -- became less and less frequent until they stopped this year. The eight-member clan now shops at Target and Costco Wholesale Corp (COST).

    “Things might be a little bit more expensive, but not so much so that it would keep me away,” he said.

    Costco Productivity

    Ton’s research has centered on retailers that include discount club Costco, whose chief executive officer, Craig Jelinek, offered his support publicly earlier this month for legislation to raise the federal minimum wage.

    Costco, which offers a starting hourly wage of $11.50 in all states and employee schedules that are generally predictable, has higher worker productivity and a lower rate of turnover than its competitors, Ton found.

    Hancock, the retired CPA in Delaware, said she hasn’t abandoned Wal-Mart altogether because she likes the low prices on the items she can find in stock. White, the shopper in California, said those low prices were crucial to his family as he started out his career.

    “When I was in law school, it really helped us out,” White said.

    Wal-Mart shoppers for more than a decade, White’s family continued to shop there even once he started earning more money.

    “I was pro-Wal-Mart even when our friends rolled their eyes,” he said. “I don’t defend them anymore.”

    He added a caveat: “They could get us back if they fixed these problems.”

    To contact the reporter on this story: Renee Dudley in New York at rdudley6@bloomberg.net

    To contact the editor responsible for this story: Robin Ajello at rajello@bloomberg.net


  2. #2
    nf fbt funw glbhuof gmhp SLOPPYSECONDS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    12,778
    Blog Entries
    3

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    well anytime world idea economics wanna help figa obvious

    just got a ask fa help

    any century

    universtiys too ans free a charge

    thankyou

  3. #3
    JUB Addict SaskGuy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Canada
    Gender
    Male
    Orientation
    Gay
    Status
    Single
    Posts
    1,915

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    Wal-Mart has so much stuff, that it hardly has anything anymore. This is what happens when you try to jam pack every type of item under one roof... you lose selection! Plus, it used to be the place to go if you wanted to save money, but everything is so expensive now!
    And yes, the aisles being blocked up with crap is so irritating, especially when you can't even access what's on the shelves!

    It seems that when you need help, there's not an employee in sight. When you just want to run in and pick up a few things, they stop you every single step you take, asking if you need help. Also... aren't the greeters supposed to greet you? they don't seem to do that anymore. I don't mind, as I never really cared about that whole thing, but they're basically getting paid to sit there all day.

  4. #4
    JockBoy87
    Guest

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    Thanks for quoting the whole article so I didn't have to click on the link

    I agree, the stocking problems are awful, and an insult for wasting my time.

  5. #5
    JUB Addict maxpowr9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Boston
    Gender
    Male
    Orientation
    Gay
    Status
    Open Relationship
    Posts
    8,839
    Blog Entries
    3

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    The only reason I shopped at a Walmart recently was because I heard on the internet allegedly that they were selling Star Wars: The Old Republic time cards for $15 accidentally as a discount. I bought the remaining lot in the store [4 of them] for $60 so that was something on the internet that was true!

    Still would never shop at Walmart or Ikea [the furniture store version of Walmart] ever again.

  6. #6
    Chief Meteorologist
    jdcnow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Dallas-Fort Worth
    Gender
    Male
    Orientation
    Gay
    Status
    Single
    Posts
    5,789
    Blog Entries
    12

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    Quote Originally Posted by SaskGuy View Post
    Also... aren't the greeters supposed to greet you? they don't seem to do that anymore. I don't mind, as I never really cared about that whole thing, but they're basically getting paid to sit there all day.
    Well, take this from someone who works in storefront retail. And as someone who previously worked for a Walmart in the past (although, I absolutely will not disclose where I work, now). The people greeters at the front door are supposed to be used for, and the originally intended use of the job position is to A) greet customers who enter and leave, thus projecting a PR image of friendliness (retail is partly a PR job, just like any other profession that deals with the general public directly, so this is actually important and relevant), B) check in guests who have merchandise they want to return, by putting a sticker on each item (this was done as a security measure to prevent return fraud, so that a customer couldn't just grab stuff off the shelves, walk up to Customer Service, and say, "Well, I need to return this..." - no sticker on the item meant the customer did not check in with the door greeter, and this *might* - not for certain, but *might* be a possible instance of theft), C) to prevent shoplifters already in the store from just waltzing out with merchandise just as big as you please (seeing someone sitting at the front door may not have been much of a deterant, but it was a decent deterant, nonetheless).

    The problem with the greeters is that management companywide, basically saw them as not their intended job and purpose, but instead as extra hands out on the salesfloor, away from their intended posts at the front door. "Gotta keep the labor/personnel costs low, so lets pull them off their posts, and have them go stock so-and-so departments, instead of actually hiring people for those departments."

    It's all about getting away with doing more work with less people.


  7. #7

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    Always wondered when they were going to find a way to somehow self-destruct, insightful article.

    Being a Target snob, I fear if I were to step foot in Wal-Mart I may burst into flames.

  8. #8

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    Quote Originally Posted by jdcnow View Post
    It's all about getting away with doing more work with less people.
    Sadly, that's starting to become the norm for most employers now.

  9. #9
    I love the way you laugh. Thynight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Gender
    Male
    Status
    Single
    Posts
    7,182

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    Quote Originally Posted by SaskGuy View Post
    Also... aren't the greeters supposed to greet you? they don't seem to do that anymore.

    Wal-Mart doesn't have greeters anymore. They have not had them in months.
    I couldn't get my mind off you all day.
    ~~~~ ~~

  10. #10
    BENDERBOY
    Guest

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    I was at Asda/Walmart here in the UK last night at 1;30 in the morning, the place had about 20 people restocking the place and one guy dealing with customers, of which there was about 5.

    Asked one of the guys how long his shift was, told me he worked from eight in the evening through to 10am the following day.

  11. #11
    JUB Addict maxpowr9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Boston
    Gender
    Male
    Orientation
    Gay
    Status
    Open Relationship
    Posts
    8,839
    Blog Entries
    3

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    Cutting labor, especially ones that are underpaid, is always a sign of bad business. Best Buy cut back the commission-based salespeople for a flat wage and sales plummeted. Coincidence? I think not.

  12. #12
    Chief Meteorologist
    jdcnow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Dallas-Fort Worth
    Gender
    Male
    Orientation
    Gay
    Status
    Single
    Posts
    5,789
    Blog Entries
    12

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    Quote Originally Posted by ElmosToe View Post
    Sadly, that's starting to become the norm for most employers now.
    Unfortunately so. Now, from what I have seen, from over 11 and a half years in this profession, I say "getting away with", because businesses like Walmart only do what they do, because retail in general gets away with the shady business practices it gets away with as a whole. I personally have worked for Kmart Supercenter, Walmart, Dollar Tree (4 years, almost 2 as an hourly assistant manager), as well as smaller and mom-and-pop businesses.

    Tying in with shady business practices in order to trim the budget, I'll tell you one of Dollar Tree's dirty little secrets >> When you are clocked out for lunch, even though lunch is your UNPAID personal time, under penalty of being written up, up to and including getting fired, you are strictly forbidden from leaving the store. Because they want to keep just two people in the stores. They don't want to have to have a third person to cover for another person's lunch - that would require them to spend money on hiring and employing that third person. So you literally were not allowed to leave, even though you saw no payment for that time you still stayed at the store. And that's if you were even allowed a lunch, if your store mgr or district/regional manager allowed it. Dollar Tree got into a huge class-action lawsuit last year, and it's still going on, as a matter of fact.

    Or the 2010 news story by local Dallas ABC station WFAA-TV Channel 8. It was an attenton-drawing News 8 report that caused Dollar Tree to stop selling China-made plastic copies of the American Flag - with 61 stars.

    Believe me when I tell you - Not just Walmart, Not just Dollar Tree, Not just this store or that one, but Retail as a whole has been virtually getting away with murder FOR YEARS!!! Customers notice here and there - long lines at Walmart, empty shelves abound, but don't really know why. Well, now, you know. Now, you know the ugly truth - Anything to trim the budget and save a buck for that omni-important bottom line.


  13. #13

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    Quote Originally Posted by jdcnow View Post
    Anything to trim the budget and save a buck for that omni-important bottom line.
    What's even more scary is on top of everything you mentioned there, most retailers operate in the red the majority of the year (or so they say). Their saving grace is the all important Black Friday sales events and subsequent Christmas and New Years sales. Sometimes I do wonder when it will all come tumbling down (oooh, a good old Ziggy Marley song).

  14. #14
    Wildly Inappropriate SonOfSlobone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Iowa
    Orientation
    Gay
    Status
    Single
    Posts
    3,230

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    Quote Originally Posted by jdcnow View Post
    Well, take this from someone who works in storefront retail. And as someone who previously worked for a Walmart in the past (although, I absolutely will not disclose where I work, now). The people greeters at the front door are supposed to be used for, and the originally intended use of the job position is to A) greet customers who enter and leave, thus projecting a PR image of friendliness (retail is partly a PR job, just like any other profession that deals with the general public directly, so this is actually important and relevant), B) check in guests who have merchandise they want to return, by putting a sticker on each item (this was done as a security measure to prevent return fraud, so that a customer couldn't just grab stuff off the shelves, walk up to Customer Service, and say, "Well, I need to return this..." - no sticker on the item meant the customer did not check in with the door greeter, and this *might* - not for certain, but *might* be a possible instance of theft), C) to prevent shoplifters already in the store from just waltzing out with merchandise just as big as you please (seeing someone sitting at the front door may not have been much of a deterant, but it was a decent deterant, nonetheless).

    The problem with the greeters is that management companywide, basically saw them as not their intended job and purpose, but instead as extra hands out on the salesfloor, away from their intended posts at the front door. "Gotta keep the labor/personnel costs low, so lets pull them off their posts, and have them go stock so-and-so departments, instead of actually hiring people for those departments."

    It's all about getting away with doing more work with less people.
    Greeters? I haven't seen a greeter in years, and I'm in WalMart all the time. And I agree with the article, about merchandise not being stocked. I tried all summer to buy some ordinary Bermuda shorts, and they never had them in my size even once. And I've literally never seen an employee in the menswear department.

  15. #15
    Chief Meteorologist
    jdcnow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Dallas-Fort Worth
    Gender
    Male
    Orientation
    Gay
    Status
    Single
    Posts
    5,789
    Blog Entries
    12

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    Quote Originally Posted by ElmosToe View Post
    Sometimes I do wonder when it will all come tumbling down (oooh, a good old Ziggy Marley song).
    Prediction - and you read it here, first! I don't know when it will happen, but I have a friend who studies businesses, kinda like a consultant. His girlfriend is a store manager for a "health and beauty goods"-type store. He and I talk and we also watch shows like "Undercover Boss". And we don't know precisely when, but we do see a huge bubble in retail - not from a Wall Street perspective, although, kinda. But more from a business operations standpoint - kind of when Kmart almost went under, in the early 2000s, before Sears bought them. We do see a HUGE business operations-type bubble in storefront retail. And by retail businesses doing what they're doing, and kind of these almost Faustian business practices of, the example of the skeleton crew in the Walmart Supercenter, keeping as few people on as humanly possible, sacrificing customer service and in-stocked shelves for profit at the bottom line created by running the business on less people to begin with. I seriously don't know how long this can go on, either. But know that when this bubble we see, when it collapses, as all bubbles do - expect it to make Enron and Too Big To Fail look like Sunday Brunch. If a giant like Walmart were to actually go under, seeing as how many people in the USA alone it employs - you wanna talk about Too Big To Fail - I believe the nation's unemployment rate would double almost overnight!


  16. #16
    Chief Meteorologist
    jdcnow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Dallas-Fort Worth
    Gender
    Male
    Orientation
    Gay
    Status
    Single
    Posts
    5,789
    Blog Entries
    12

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    Quote Originally Posted by SonOfSlobone View Post
    Greeters? I haven't seen a greeter in years, and I'm in WalMart all the time. And I agree with the article, about merchandise not being stocked. I tried all summer to buy some ordinary Bermuda shorts, and they never had them in my size even once. And I've literally never seen an employee in the menswear department.
    And my post you quoted is exactly why you don't see greeters anymore. Save that dollar by scraping by and using the greeters elsewhere in the store. They're actually still there at Walmart, believe it or not - it's actually the lowest, bottom-rung pay grade in the company. They're just being used somewhere else.


  17. #17

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    What do "greeters" do?

    Our stores have people who check give directions if you ask for them and they check your bags when you leave.
    .

  18. #18
    Chief Meteorologist
    jdcnow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Dallas-Fort Worth
    Gender
    Male
    Orientation
    Gay
    Status
    Single
    Posts
    5,789
    Blog Entries
    12

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    Quote Originally Posted by pat grimshaw View Post
    What do "greeters" do?
    Quote Originally Posted by jdcnow View Post
    Well, take this from someone who works in storefront retail. And as someone who previously worked for a Walmart in the past (although, I absolutely will not disclose where I work, now). The people greeters at the front door are supposed to be used for, and the originally intended use of the job position is to A) greet customers who enter and leave, thus projecting a PR image of friendliness (retail is partly a PR job, just like any other profession that deals with the general public directly, so this is actually important and relevant), B) check in guests who have merchandise they want to return, by putting a sticker on each item (this was done as a security measure to prevent return fraud, so that a customer couldn't just grab stuff off the shelves, walk up to Customer Service, and say, "Well, I need to return this..." - no sticker on the item meant the customer did not check in with the door greeter, and this *might* - not for certain, but *might* be a possible instance of theft), C) to prevent shoplifters already in the store from just waltzing out with merchandise just as big as you please (seeing someone sitting at the front door may not have been much of a deterant, but it was a decent deterant, nonetheless).
    10 characters


  19. #19
    counterspade
    Guest

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    Let me shed some personal insight on this. I am your friendly Walmart Sales Associate.

    1.) I agree (surprised?) with nearly everything in this article. Walmart in itself is becoming too big for its own good. I can't count how many customers either complain because of poor service from other departments, or thank me for actually taking the time to help them one-on-one.

    2.) The understaffing is ridiculous. I was hired to cover the Toy department. As of today, I cover Toys, Hardware, Automotive, Fabrics & Crafts, HBA (Heath & Beauty Aids) and Sporting Goods when it's a basic merchandise question. I also am a backup cashier, a backup cart pusher, and a backup truck unloader. That means, I don't know where I'll end up whenever I come in that day. I primarily work second shift, which on a normal day, starts around 1 PM. By 4 PM, all of the first shift associates have left, leaving three of us at most to man that entire side of the store. When we're called for backup, our departments take a toll. When we return, especially for me in Toys, merchandise is in the wrong location, on the floor or stolen. The other departments have trouble covering mine because they're understaffed or not there, either. Then I get thrown under the bus by management for not "doing my job," by straightening my department and assisting customers.

    3.) I am severely underpaid. I don't dare ask for a raise, but when I'm making less than a cashier, unloader, cart pusher, and an associate in the other departments I cover, it pisses me off a little. They then ask me to stay late (for third shift), or come in on my days off to stock the shelves for my department and others I cover...then have the AUDACITY to tell me to cut my hours. Then BITCH because there's no coverage for the department.

    4.) Walmart's 'Open Door Policy' is a joke. I just feel like trying to talk to management is intimidating. Don't get me wrong, I understand they're under fire from the store manager, but asking for simple things makes you fear for your job. For instance, I had to change my availability due to the fact I acquired a second job. I was grilled because I had to block out two days out of the week. I appreciate them giving me as many hours as possible on a weekly basis (only because they know I'll fully cover everything), but when I need those days off, so I can work a second job to keep my house over my head, some understanding needs to be met. I work seven days a week and still can't make ends meet. Calling out sick or for a personal emergency is scary, too. You could come in the next day, sick as a dog, and get fired for being absent. Then you won't be replaced, because it's too costly.

    5.) Most of the new associates at my store are temps. They're hired, put through the training, then when things slow, fired. I believe that's appalling. If we're going to hire someone, please hire them for a part time position. They're seeking work because they need it, and ripping the mat out from underneath them to keep themselves and possibly their families afloat makes me sick.

    With all that being said, I do value and strive to do a great job each day I'm there. But the wool is no longer pulled over my eyes. I try to act as an encouraging voice for not only myself, but my fellow associates, who are in the same boat I am. We're stretched way too thin, are exhausted and some are even getting hurt. It's like we're working in Hell, and many, like myself, are trapped due to bills needing to be paid, and jobs so difficult to find.

    Save money. Live better. Walmart.

  20. #20
    Suck my dick, Scalia! FuryOfFirestorm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Edgewater, FL
    Gender
    Male
    Orientation
    Gay
    Status
    Available
    Posts
    2,215
    Blog Entries
    4

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    I just noticed that I haven't seen a greeter at Wal-Mart in a long time. There was a Wal-Mart located a few miles from my house, but last year it shut down and it moved a few miles further away in a new location. And this was 6 months after the original location went through renovations to add refrigerator units for Frozen Foods and Liquor!

    I've heard rumor that Wal-Mart will actually shut down stores if they're forced to allow unions, so my guess is that the workers in the area unionized, then Wal-Mart jumped ship to a new location to fuck them over. The original location is now split into a Bealls Outlet and a Big Lots.

    Around the same time as this, the K-Mart across the block from Wal-Mart shut down. It's still been empty since.

    I suspect the ease and great deals offered by online shopping has put a dent in Wal-Mart's bottom line, as well as word spreading about their shitty treatment and low-pay their employees get.

  21. #21
    Chief Meteorologist
    jdcnow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Dallas-Fort Worth
    Gender
    Male
    Orientation
    Gay
    Status
    Single
    Posts
    5,789
    Blog Entries
    12

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    Quote Originally Posted by FuryOfFirestorm View Post
    I've heard rumor that Wal-Mart will actually shut down stores if they're forced to allow unions, so my guess is that the workers in the area unionized, then Wal-Mart jumped ship to a new location to fuck them over.
    Yup. They view unions kinda like killer bees.


  22. #22
    Chief Meteorologist
    jdcnow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Dallas-Fort Worth
    Gender
    Male
    Orientation
    Gay
    Status
    Single
    Posts
    5,789
    Blog Entries
    12

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    OMG, I'd forgotten all about this video, then it hit me. This old 2005 political cartoon video by JibJab - "Big Box Mart". Trust me - you don't even wanna know how much real truth-telling there actually is in this.



  23. #23

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    Fascinating read, JDC and Counterspade - thanks for posting this!
    http://www.justusboys.com/forum/signaturepics/sigpic216959_1.gif

  24. #24
    JUB Addict The Fly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    MPLS
    Gender
    Male
    Orientation
    Gay
    Status
    Single
    Posts
    1,684

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    I have never been in a Walmart.

  25. #25
    WTF????? refujiunderground's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Gender
    Male
    Orientation
    Gay
    Status
    Single
    Posts
    10,119
    Blog Entries
    43

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    well, things are going to get worse. america is long past it's prime and it's not going to pick back up to where it once was. our future will probably be a damn third world country.
    Last edited by refujiunderground; March 27th, 2013 at 11:19 PM.
    one thing about the closet/you don't have to hurry/it will be bad tomorrow/so brother, don't you worry

  26. #26
    Are u haleloo ya ? Telstra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Australia
    Gender
    Male
    Status
    Single
    Posts
    29,608

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    Is this what Walmart looks like ?



    NEVER LISTEN TO A ONE SIDED STORY AND JUDGE.

  27. #27
    JockBoy87
    Guest

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    Quote Originally Posted by Telstra View Post
    Is this what Walmart looks like ?
    Yeah. That's your typical walmart sans the obese lady with her pants falling down (you figure that one out) and the table in the middle of the aisle covered with discount plastic toys.

  28. #28
    Chief Meteorologist
    jdcnow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Dallas-Fort Worth
    Gender
    Male
    Orientation
    Gay
    Status
    Single
    Posts
    5,789
    Blog Entries
    12

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    What Walmart needs...what Walmart truly, truly needs is a turnaround artist in the vein of the late Jim Cantalupo, the then-CEO of McDonald's, who brought that chain back from the brink after it was in dire straits, back in 2003. Walmart needs a true turnaround artist, and fast!

    At the one Walmart I used to work at, I actually met some of the store's older coworkers, some of whom were there when that particular store location opened in 1982. And they actually met Mr Sam. And they would tell you that if Mr Sam came back from the dead, and saw the store chain he founded as it is now, he'd be absolutely furious! Just fit to be tied.


  29. #29
    counterspade
    Guest

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    Quote Originally Posted by jdcnow View Post
    What Walmart needs...what Walmart truly, truly needs is a turnaround artist in the vein of the late Jim Cantalupo, the then-CEO of McDonald's, who brought that chain back from the brink after it was in dire straits, back in 2003. Walmart needs a true turnaround artist, and fast!

    At the one Walmart I used to work at, I actually met some of the store's older coworkers, some of whom were there when that particular store location opened in 1982. And they actually met Mr Sam. And they would tell you that if Mr Sam came back from the dead, and saw the store chain he founded as it is now, he'd be absolutely furious! Just fit to be tied.
    Yep, I have a few at my store who have been with the company for over 25 years, and they remember meeting Sam Walton. They say the same thing; this is not the company he founded, and I'm sure he's rolled over in his grave so many times, he has others next to him following suit. It's sad indeed, the money-hungry big businessmen who don't seem to care.

  30. #30
    Is the King of JUB Beachguyj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Near Fort Bottomdale
    Orientation
    Gay
    Status
    Single
    Posts
    7,241

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    I agree that Walmarts are very poorly restocked. I shop at a Walmart Neighborhood Market and love the prices but I often have to buy a different food item or brand from what I wanted because the item I need is out of stock.
    In his autumn, before the winter, comes man's last mad surge of youth

  31. #31
    Is the King of JUB Beachguyj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Near Fort Bottomdale
    Orientation
    Gay
    Status
    Single
    Posts
    7,241

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    Quote Originally Posted by BENDERBOY View Post
    I was at Asda/Walmart here in the UK last night at 1;30 in the morning, the place had about 20 people restocking the place and one guy dealing with customers, of which there was about 5.

    Asked one of the guys how long his shift was, told me he worked from eight in the evening through to 10am the following day.
    There are different rules when it comes to a lot of Europe, the people have decided that their governments want decent paying jobs with benefits and some with generous vacation time.

    In the US things are different. Big business controls everything and they don't care about workers. Shitty jobs are hard to come by and most are "at will" meaning they can fire you for whatever reason they want.
    In his autumn, before the winter, comes man's last mad surge of youth

  32. #32
    JUB Addict
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Seattle
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    4,686
    Blog Entries
    16

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    i just got back from a (5) years of service banquet that was held at a new local convention center.

    where we were served drinks, dinner, dessert and i got to meet our new president, talk with my old manager and meet all the other corporate people. do they do that for wal-mart employees?

    wal-mart did come up as a topic, and they are running local ads targeting my employer. however our part of the country is probably the only area that has the kind of store that we have. we sell everything, they just built two new stores that are over 100,000 square feet, and ive been able to work in 5 different stores.

    we have places to charge electric cars and the new store has things to encourage biking to work. check out times are usually faster than a convenience store.

    its pretty unique in that you can start from the very lowest job and eventually run the whole company. its that kind of idea that makes working here a dream - if retail is your thing.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	MG2_FredMeyer_big.jpg 
Views:	36 
Size:	54.4 KB 
ID:	941006


  33. #33
    Broken... mark1111's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Cape Cod
    Orientation
    Bisexual
    Status
    Single
    Posts
    1,359

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    I started working at a big box retail store and it is just as most described here. I was promised full time, I barely make 15 hours a week now. We have a new store manager that believes in the stick approach to employers, no carrot. He screams at everyone and has no respect. I tried to help customers find what they are looking for and he told me if customers are to stupid to find things on the shelf or don't know how much it costs, he doesn't want them in the store! Most of us now look the other way when we see shoplifting. We don't care.

  34. #34
    Are u haleloo ya ? Telstra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Australia
    Gender
    Male
    Status
    Single
    Posts
    29,608

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    Quote Originally Posted by mark1111 View Post
    I started working at a big box retail store and it is just as most described here. I was promised full time, I barely make 15 hours a week now. We have a new store manager that believes in the stick approach to employers, no carrot. He screams at everyone and has no respect. I tried to help customers find what they are looking for and he told me if customers are to stupid to find things on the shelf or don't know how much it costs, he doesn't want them in the store! Most of us now look the other way when we see shoplifting. We don't care.
    wow, how can he be a manager.
    Are each head manager responsible for the store making a profit or lost ?


    NEVER LISTEN TO A ONE SIDED STORY AND JUDGE.

  35. #35
    Chief Meteorologist
    jdcnow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Dallas-Fort Worth
    Gender
    Male
    Orientation
    Gay
    Status
    Single
    Posts
    5,789
    Blog Entries
    12

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    ^ Yes they are. In many retail jobs, store managers are given several quotas they have to regularly meet, in order to keep their job - sales, profit margins, and a labor/manpower hours budget that they're expected to keep under control. My supermarket in particular is a prime example - April 17th is our store's annual inventory - 3 weeks from now. Inventory is one of a store's most important and critical times of the whole year, second only to the Chrismas/Holiday shopping season, and usually retail companies might actually splurge a bit on the payroll/manpower hours budget, so that we have the manpower and people we need to get the store ready for inventory ahead of time. Not so, with my store. Sales are down, so we've been told, "No Overtime". And if they have to send you home early or give you an extra day off to cut the OT you've racked up, they will do it. We're just expected to skimp by on less, and still expected to get more done.

    As the article said...
    Retailers consider labor -- usually their largest controllable expense -- an easy cost-cutting target...
    Foolhardy and wreckless to be sure, but that's the way they see it.


  36. #36

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    Quote Originally Posted by jdcnow View Post
    ^ Yes they are. In many retail jobs, store managers are given several quotas they have to regularly meet, in order to keep their job - sales, profit margins, and a labor/manpower hours budget that they're expected to keep under control. My supermarket in particular is a prime example - April 17th is our store's annual inventory - 3 weeks from now. Inventory is one of a store's most important and critical times of the whole year, second only to the Chrismas/Holiday shopping season, and usually retail companies might actually splurge a bit on the payroll/manpower hours budget, so that we have the manpower and people we need to get the store ready for inventory ahead of time. Not so, with my store. Sales are down, so we've been told, "No Overtime". And if they have to send you home early or give you an extra day off to cut the OT you've racked up, they will do it. We're just expected to skimp by on less, and still expected to get more done.

    As the article said...


    Foolhardy and wreckless to be sure, but that's the way they see it.
    I've worked for several companies that do this hour cutting and pushing the few remaining employees ... they've all gone under and closed down.
    http://www.justusboys.com/forum/signaturepics/sigpic216959_1.gif

  37. #37
    JUB Addict Stoowii's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Houston
    Gender
    Male
    Orientation
    Gay
    Status
    Single
    Posts
    1,840
    Blog Entries
    2

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    I, myself, am a Targé kinda guy. Quality over quantity.

  38. #38
    boom boom chaos maker crimsonpaine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Maryland
    Gender
    Male
    Orientation
    Gay
    Posts
    5,679
    Blog Entries
    8

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    Finding anything at walmart is a kind of a game. We have a friend who works there (yeah I know, who doesn't) and she says that a lot of the merchandise that they receive is stuff corporate just sends them, not stuff that is needed or that sells in the store. so it sits collecting dust. With walmart, it has seriously gotten to the point where is you find something you like, you better get as much as you can, because it may have been something corporate sent and not something the store will ever get again, because apparently it doesn't matter what sells vs. what doesn't.
    I may be bad, but I'm perfectly good at it.



  39. #39
    JUB Addict roadtripboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Gender
    Male
    Orientation
    Gay
    Status
    Single
    Posts
    1,910

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    If you can find it, check out a book called "The Big Store". It's about what happened at Sears in the 1980s. It shows clearly how every "superstore" will fail at some point in it's lifespan. Wal-Mart may be on the verge of that failure.

  40. #40
    JockBoy87
    Guest

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    Quote Originally Posted by crimsonpaine View Post
    Finding anything at walmart is a kind of a game. We have a friend who works there (yeah I know, who doesn't) and she says that a lot of the merchandise that they receive is stuff corporate just sends them, not stuff that is needed or that sells in the store. so it sits collecting dust. With walmart, it has seriously gotten to the point where is you find something you like, you better get as much as you can, because it may have been something corporate sent and not something the store will ever get again, because apparently it doesn't matter what sells vs. what doesn't.
    They used to carry a very good turtle bar mix. I was so disappointed when I couldn't find it anymore. My recipes for it always end up being inconsistent.

  41. #41
    Chief Meteorologist
    jdcnow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Dallas-Fort Worth
    Gender
    Male
    Orientation
    Gay
    Status
    Single
    Posts
    5,789
    Blog Entries
    12

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    Quote Originally Posted by roadtripboy View Post
    If you can find it, check out a book called "The Big Store". It's about what happened at Sears in the 1980s. It shows clearly how every "superstore" will fail at some point in it's lifespan. Wal-Mart may be on the verge of that failure.
    Methinks that, honestly, Walmart is actually a ripe takeover target for another retailer. And maybe a hostile takeover, at that.



  42. #42
    JUB Addict maxpowr9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Boston
    Gender
    Male
    Orientation
    Gay
    Status
    Open Relationship
    Posts
    8,839
    Blog Entries
    3

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    Quote Originally Posted by roadtripboy View Post
    If you can find it, check out a book called "The Big Store". It's about what happened at Sears in the 1980s. It shows clearly how every "superstore" will fail at some point in it's lifespan. Wal-Mart may be on the verge of that failure.
    Sears I feel is a unique problem because I had to do a massive case study on them. It wasn't just an inventory problem. You look specifically at their auto-division and how they deliberately gouged people, that is a sign of a retail business destined to fail. Kenmore and Craftsman used to be great brands as they were both made in the USA and of high quality. Now, they are pretty much Chinese garbage which is what most of Walmart is.

    Candidly speaking, if I truly want to buy "crap" [as in cheaply-made goods], I will head to the dollar store and spend my money there instead of Walmart.

    For example: I never understood why people buy name brand soap, [detergent is another matter as that shiz is so watered down at the dollar store] especially dish soap like Dawn. It's the same morons that buy the name brand aspirin instead of the generic version which has the same ingredients but is much cheaper. Stupid people are stupid I guess.

  43. #43
    Chief Meteorologist
    jdcnow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Dallas-Fort Worth
    Gender
    Male
    Orientation
    Gay
    Status
    Single
    Posts
    5,789
    Blog Entries
    12

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    Hey, Walmart Management - Why do you allow this to go on?

    OK, so about 730ish tonight, I make the mistake of going to the Supercenter closest to my apartment, and it's on the same public bus route as my apartment. So it's convenient to go to. But once you get inside, it's anything BUT convenient. Especially at the front checkouts. By 815pm, I got up there - and my bus to go home was supposed to come by at 830pm. So I had 15 minutes to get checked out. This was what I came to, when I walked up to the frontend...



    This right here is not the fault of the cashiers - they're just there in the line of fire, and probably taking heat and smack off the customers for the backup being like it is.

    This is not the fault of the front checkouts supervisors, who are simply following a staffing schedule they did not write, and are there busting their asses trying to manage this 3-ring circus that would even make the late 19th/early 20th century circus promoter John Ringling shake his head in shame.

    No, folks, this is the fault of management. A management who will not properly staff their frontend with enough cashiers to meet the demand on a busy Saturday night. A management that doesn't give a good goddamned how long you wait in line. A management that doesn't care if anybody walked out the store with merchandise - Literally, there was so much of a crowd, that if I actually wanted to take my shopping cart and the unpaid for groceries in it, and walk out the door with it, lock stock and barrel just as big as you please, tell me please, who would have stopped me?

    I didn't want to, but I left my cart standing there with the stuff in it - I had a bus to catch, and had no choice but to leave it behind. I ended up going to the Kroger down the street from this store, on the same bus line. At that Kroger, there were 7 out of 10 lanes open (5 regular lanes and 2 express lanes), along with the self-checkouts. The checkouts were each double-staffed with a cashier and sacker at each lane, and there was barely a line in the place. I was literally in and out of the frontend in less than 2 minutes.

    Are you listening, Bentonville? Just sayin'...

    If you look closely, the woman in the brown, just to the left of the battery display summarizes the whole picture quite clearly.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Walmart Madness 2013 05 04 - 20 24 43.png  


  44. #44
    Slut Draven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Gender
    Male
    Orientation
    Gay
    Posts
    255

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    Having worked at Walmart many times in the past, these things mentioned are very very much true. In fact at the electronics department where I worked at my last Walmart job would have been handled better if it were ran by a pack of chimpanzees. The mindset of the morning people was always "It's too early for this shit, I don't want to deal with anyone at 6:00 AM" and it was always the same mentality later in the evening only on the flipslide. Then you have some employees who conveniently need to go on break or take their lunch just as things are picking up (12 PM - 5 PM rush) leaving the area with maybe 2 employees and a shitload of confused, angry and disgruntled customers (who were already angry because employees had been actively avoiding them throughout the store).

    As for the barren landscapes, my particular store didn't seem to have much of this problem. In fact other than customer service/hospitality, making the store look presentable was number one on the priorities list so anything that really looked "raided" or deserted was usually a seasonal/half off/bargain bin/endcap type of thing.

    I'm not trying to defend Walmart at all by any means of the word, in fact the core of these problems lies within upper management and Human Resources. The employees don't feel like they are being paid enough for the workload that is being dumped on them and are taking it out on the customers by avoiding them (and I'm not condoning the employee's behavior), poor communication and attitudes within personnel and management can greatly affect the atmosphere of a store, I remember going to a Big K-Mart recently and it felt like a ghost town.

    Walmart is notorious for treating its employees like crap and then having no problems with having them replaced if they don't suck it up 100% I got along pretty much with everyone at my last Walmart job (except for one or two associate managers) but it was a very superficial and a very FAKE relationship. I hardly acted like I would in real life, normally I wouldn't smile 24/7 to the point of resembling the Joker, or dote on people hand and foot to the point of suffocation, and I wouldn't double & triple check things for someone because I just wanted them to accept the first answer they got and move on. I did all of those things because that's what I was being paid to do; provide a (fantasy) pleasant experience which (imho) isn't asking too much from a paying customer's POV. Attitude is everything, and even in a deserted-like Big K-Mart can be a great place to shop if at least one person is at least trying to be personable.
    Last edited by Draven; May 4th, 2013 at 09:26 PM.
    gone was the glow of blue velvet....
    I live among the creatures of the night; I'm living in the forest of a dream

  45. #45
    veni, vidi, reliqui
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Gender
    Male
    Orientation
    Gay
    Status
    Partnered
    Posts
    33,642

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    Quote Originally Posted by roadtripboy View Post
    If you can find it, check out a book called "The Big Store". It's about what happened at Sears in the 1980s. It shows clearly how every "superstore" will fail at some point in it's lifespan. Wal-Mart may be on the verge of that failure.
    I think that this syndrome is called 'Too Big Not to Fail'. We have seen it with almost all the retail 'Giants' in North America.


    In the case of Walmart, this failure can't come too soon for me. Time for North America to re-think the whole philosophy of loading up on cheap plastic shit made by virtual slave labour in China.

  46. #46
    JUB Addict The Fly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    MPLS
    Gender
    Male
    Orientation
    Gay
    Status
    Single
    Posts
    1,684

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    This is NOT Walmart's fault/problem. People have known what Walmart's all about for years, but they/you keep patronizing them...so it's they're/your fault.
    If I receive service or products that are below par, I quit using them and move on to their competition.
    People who shop Walmart do so for the "Low, Low Prices". Well along with "Low, Low Prices" you get low quality, low service, and low availability.... but on the positive side they have smiley faces everywhere.
    I have never, and will never, shop Walmart because of their business philosophy.

  47. #47
    Do I dare to eat a peach?
    palbert's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Coastal Downeast Maine
    Gender
    Male
    Orientation
    Gay
    Status
    Single
    Posts
    11,132

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    You don't shop at Walmart. You forage.

    The quality is deplorable and the service non-existent.

    I don't shop there.

  48. #48
    Rambunctiously Pugnacious JayHawk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    River Quay - KC
    Gender
    Male
    Orientation
    Gay
    Status
    Single
    Posts
    24,238

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    I have witnessed the decline of Wal-Mart. I have always tried to support my local grocer because you get better fresh foods and they will meet your personal needs if you ask. For instance, the local Price Chopper stocks Vernors Ginger Ale at my request.



    I did end up at WalMart yesterday though... for Dobie pads...



    couldnt find them anywhere and they are a must for a good clean up on a ceramic topped stove....


    I don't want Walmart to die... they simply need to reorganize and re-brand. That means closing several stores to reach that sustainable profit level that allows proper service. They could easily do it around here. I live within a mile and a half of three super centers.

    Another thought, as the recession wound down in 2011, I was moving out here to Kansas. That took me through the panhandle of Florida. The biggest noticeable effect of the downturn in that area was bog box blight. There were so many empty boxes scattered everywhere, i have no idea how whole communities recover from such mass exodus. I can see it here as well but on a different scale. Here as lower income families move into areas you can see entire shopping areas become blighted and empty except for the two or three anchors. That movement around KC is outward from the city center.

    Anyways way off topic....
    Everyone can be great, because everyone can serve.
    ~ Martin Luther King, Jr.


  49. #49
    Rambunctiously Pugnacious JayHawk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    River Quay - KC
    Gender
    Male
    Orientation
    Gay
    Status
    Single
    Posts
    24,238

    Code of Conduct

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    Quote Originally Posted by rareboy View Post
    I think that this syndrome is called 'Too Big Not to Fail'. We have seen it with almost all the retail 'Giants' in North America.


    In the case of Walmart, this failure can't come too soon for me. Time for North America to re-think the whole philosophy of loading up on cheap plastic shit made by virtual slave labour in China.
    Hey my Dobie pads were made in Mexico.....
    Everyone can be great, because everyone can serve.
    ~ Martin Luther King, Jr.


  50. #50

    Re: A very eye-opening article about the very serious problems at Walmart.

    I haven't been in a Wal*Mart in years. The OP's article explains why. The Wal*Mart stores around here suffer from everything in the article... empty shelves, long checkout lines, virtually no floor help. They can't even keep managers and general managers for long.

    Wal*Mart places ads everywhere here begging for help, but no one wants to wants to work there. Where I live there's a massive shortage of help that employers start you at decent wages but Wal*Mart and Sam's Club refuse to pay competitive wages.

    I try to do most of my shopping at local merchants and what I can't find there I go to Target or ShopKo.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | About JustUsBoys.com | Site Map | RSS | Webmasters | Advertise | Link to JUB | Report A Bug on this Page

Visit our sister sites: Broke Straight Boys | CollegeDudes.com | CollegeBoyPhysicals.com | RocketTube
All models appearing on JustUsBoys.com were over 18 at the time of photography. The records for sexually explicit images required by U.S. 2257 are kept by the
individual producers of the images. The location of the records is available by clicking the Custodian of Records link at the bottom of each gallery page.
© 2012 JustUsBoys.com. The JustUsBoys.com name and logo are registered trademarks. Labeled with ICRA and RTA. Member of ASACP and The Free Speech Coalition.