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  1. #1
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    Re: A Christmas Question for Englishmen

    It will depend on which type of Plum Pudding he made. I've seen some recipes that use carrots and Guiness, and others that use neither. There are differences in the recipe between and English Plum Pudding, Irish Plum Pudding and the American version. I can only vouch for the English version which is gorgeous!

    And of course, despite it's name, it doesn't contain plums. It is pretty much a 'heavy' fruitcake - very dark and moist, and of course the fruit is ideally soaked in brandy.

  2. #2

    Re: A Christmas Question for Englishmen

    I think it is all that fat that turns Americans off.

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    Re: A Christmas Question for Englishmen

    I'm not partial to it. I've never made it either...


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    Re: A Christmas Question for Englishmen

    Quote Originally Posted by Benvolio View Post
    I think it is all that fat that turns Americans off.
    I don't think we could possibly be thinking of the same America....
    You show courage the brave dream of

    Gallop on my old warhorse

  5. #5
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    Re: A Christmas Question for Englishmen

    A candidate for 10 Most Disgusting British Foods:

    http://www.lunch.com/jbeswick-Top_10...some-2732.html

  6. #6

    Re: A Christmas Question for Englishmen

    I bet 95% of English people wouldn't be able to tell you what a plum pudding actually is let alone have eaten one. It's an old tradition that certainly isn't part of celebrations today.

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    Re: A Christmas Question for Englishmen

    My Gran used to make puddings at Christmas, using old family recipes. I haven't been able to lay hands on any of the recipes since her passing, but I have my Mother's recipe for figgy pudding, and I know we have altered it over the years to incorporate half figs and half dried plums. I actually like the flavor better with this change, it's just a matter of taste. It was once a much-loved tradition in the family, but has fallen into disuse by the younger generations of the family. Pity. I like the older traditions, myself. At any rate, here it is... 1/2 cup (1 stick) butter, at room temperature
    2 eggs
    1 cup dark molasses
    2 cups dried figs, stems removed & chopped fine
    1/2 teaspoon grated lemon peel
    1/2 teaspoon grated orange peel
    1 cup buttermilk ( or sour milk)
    1/2 cup walnuts, chopped
    2-1/2 cups all-purpose flour
    1 teaspoon baking soda
    2 teaspoons baking powder
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
    Garnish: Whipped cream

    Preparation:
    In an electric mixer, cream the butter until fluffy. Add the eggs and molasses and beat again. Add the figs, peel, buttermilk, and walnuts. Blend 1 minute. Add the flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt, cinnamon, and nutmeg. Blend until everything is incorporated.

    Grease and flour and 8 by 4-inch souffle dish and pour in the batter. Bake in a 325-degree F. oven for 1 hour, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Make sure not to over-bake, as it will be dry...this should be a moist, dense cake-like texture.

    Spoon the pudding onto plates or cut it into wedges. Garnish with whipped cream (whipped fresh, not from a can) or serve with ice cream.

  8. #8
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    Re: A Christmas Question for Englishmen

    Quote Originally Posted by JohannBessler View Post
    ^I think of Marmite as "Food for Gods". In fact, I will lick it off my fingers. (I know--bad manners. )

    I've had spotteddick. I didn't think it too bad. I get the feeling that they may have developed it during the War, when the British War Ministry strictly rationed foodstuffs. It tastes somewhat like raisin bread.

    I've never tried any of the others. The only one that sounds really repulsive to me is Jellied Eels, but I can't eat anything with a slimy texture, British or not.
    As a Brit who lived through WWII, I can assure you that Spotted Dick was probably more ancient than that!

    We used to get it in school and it was pretty awful, as was the ginger pudding and chocolate pudding - all boiled up in specially designed tins to create a sausage shaped pud. Water used to get into the tins so that when a slice was plonked onto your plate, it had a layer of white slime around its circumference - YUK!



  9. #9
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    Re: A Christmas Question for Englishmen

    You have to flambée that kind of pudding!

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    Re: A Christmas Question for Englishmen

    Quote Originally Posted by JohannBessler View Post
    Indeed, nothing seems more quintessentially English than a plum pudding, in which various items have been placed--a coin for wealth, a wishbone for good luck, and so on.
    They put objects in their food?

    How repulsive!!!!

  11. #11

    Re: A Christmas Question for Englishmen

    When I was a kid there was always a silver sixpence (supposedly) hidden in the xmas pudding. Mum managed to arrange it so that a different child got it each year.

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    Re: A Christmas Question for Englishmen

    Another option would be http://www.englishteastore.com/walke...ing-3-5oz.html

    It has to be said however, that because it is extremely rich, one would only serve about half a fist size as a portion. Had it not been banned by the Puritans, I would imagine that Americans would have adapted it to a recipe more suited to their palate over these past couple hundred years.

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    Re: A Christmas Question for Englishmen

    Ingredients:

    Bricks
    Cement
    Wood

    I'm pink therefore I'm Spam

  14. #14
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    Re: A Christmas Question for Englishmen

    Our family pudding recipe is more Germanic and does include grated carrots.

    We make the same recipe as my Grandmother made for 60 odd years and my mother after that.

    We're having it along with my great Aunt Esther's Pumpkin pie that is baking in the over right now.

    You whip the whites separately and fold them in....Light and beautiful with whipped cream.

  15. #15
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    Re: A Christmas Question for Englishmen

    I still love Christmas Pudding, great when flamed with brandy and served with brandy butter. I remember when my Nan used to make them, they would be made in October.

    Friend of mine from France took some home one Christmas. He did not like it, he thought it was like cake and served it cold. Yuk!
    Last edited by talbot57; December 27th, 2012 at 10:46 AM.

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    Re: A Christmas Question for Englishmen

    I think it is more common to hear folks call 'plum pudding' 'christmas pudding' nowadays. Few folks make it, as it seems to be commercially available everywhere.

    Here's a link that you might enjoy. 6 hours boiling in a cloth.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/victorianchrist....shtml?page=50


    Autolycus' mention of soggy white rim is explained by the cloth wrapping being 'floured' before boiling forming a seal against water during boiling.

    When I was at school, the suet puddings we used to have most was the jam-roly-poly with custard. I quite liked them, as we never got puddings at home - my parents were far east asian immigrants


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    Re: A Christmas Question for Englishmen

    Quote Originally Posted by palbert View Post
    A candidate for 10 Most Disgusting British Foods:

    http://www.lunch.com/jbeswick-Top_10...some-2732.html
    Maybe it's my Australian upbringing, but I find almost all of those foods delicious (with the possible exception of Irn Bru). And of course I prefer Vegemite to Marmite.

    I do like a good rich plum pudding, served hot with brandy butter or cream. And how can you not love the names of some of these venerable English dishes: spotted dick, toad in the hole, bubble and squeak, faggots in gravy, and the rest.

    -T.

    "Thank God for tea! What would the world do without tea? how did it exist? I am glad I was not born before tea." (Sydney Smith)

  18. #18
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    Re: A Christmas Question for Englishmen

    Quote Originally Posted by JohannBessler View Post
    Thanks for the link, Starwarrior.

    Is Jam-roly-poly the same dish that they call "dead man's arm"? I'd love to try it. I might look for a recipe.
    You're quite right. You can bake or steam the roly poly.

    Other primary school puddings I recall, rhubarb crumble, semolina, rice pudding, jelly (=jello) and blancmange, trifle, spotted dick with custard, and sponge and custard,

    In secondary school, our cooks made deserts with crusts like bakewell tart, chocolate flan, apple pie etc. All served with custard.


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    Re: A Christmas Question for Englishmen

    FYI

    Rhubarb crumble, stems of the rhubarb plant cut into two inch chunks and cooked with sugar to form a tart (sweet and sour) mush topped with a buttery/margarine flour and sugar crumb topping.

    semolina, rice pudding, are milk based puddings. I think the rice pudding is baked with a hint of nutmeg.


    Bakewell tart has a pastry case bottom, a layer of red jam/jelly, a thick layer of frangipane, optionally topped with almond slivers and baked said to originate from the town of Bakewell somewhere in England.

    I used to love chocolate flan, it was like a cold set blancmange with a crust base.

    jelly (=jello) and blancmange, I made blancmange in school Cookery class, it's basically boiled milk with sugar and a hint of colouring (pink) and thickened with cornstarch, left to go cold and set, then a gelatinous dollop it paired up with jell(y/o).


    trifle, sponge fingers and fruit set in jelly/o on the bottom, a middle layer of set cold custard, topped with whipped cream.


  20. #20
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    Re: A Christmas Question for Englishmen

    I think almost everyone everyone in England has plum pudding at Christmas. I had to google it though because I thought wtf is plum pudding? Anyway it's called Christmas pudding here and yes everyone eats it. It's very tasty with cream and needs to be matured for at least a year to taste really good.

  21. #21
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    Re: A Christmas Question for Englishmen

    Quote Originally Posted by JohannBessler View Post
    ^The plum pudding tasted completely different from what I'd expected.

    It didn't taste of raisins at all, or suet. The taste that predominated was "spicy". Put another way, it tasted like a spice cake on steroids.

    I am puzzled at the fact that the webmaster thought it was "gross". To me, it doesn't come anywhere near that designation.
    I'm so pleased you bought and tried it. I think that many other Americans would find it different to what they'd expect - this is why I was so confused by the earlier critique about it. I was thinking that it was describing something totally different to our Christmas pudding. I must admit that while it is normally served with either brandy cream or custard, we always have a rum sauce with ours.

  22. #22

    Re: A Christmas Question for Englishmen

    Every time I click on this thread, the phrase 'tally-ho' in the opening post reminds me of the battle cry cry of red-coated cunts on horseback hunting foxes with dogs for fun.

    Supposedly outlawed in England nowadays, but when the lawmakers and judiciary are the cunts in question it's hardly surprising how so many of them still get away with it. Scum!

  23. #23

    Re: A Christmas Question for Englishmen

    I am planning a trip to England, next summer, mostly London and Oxford. I would be interested in any opinions of the best time to visit. Last time I went in August and it rained the entire time.

  24. #24
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    Re: A Christmas Question for Englishmen

    Sadly, with British weather there isn't really a guaranteed best time. In theory, late July - late September should be the better chance, but this year we had a couple of stunning weeks in April, then rain until the Olympics, and then rain gain. It really doesn't feel like we've had a summer this year!

  25. #25
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    Re: A Christmas Question for Englishmen

    Quote Originally Posted by JohannBessler View Post
    The idea I'd had in mind involves melding two cultures together, really. We have a dessert that, to my understanding, didn't translate to the other side of the pond--in the same way as plum pudding didn't translate to this side of the pond. We call that dessert a "brownie". It's something like a chocolate cake, but it's denser and richer. (These brownies were immortalized in the movie The Stepford Wives, where the character played by the Englishwoman muses,"I'll just DIE if I don't get this recipe.")

    How useful would it be to know if a brownie recipe could be merged with a plum pudding recipe? You'd have brownies so rich, and so delectable, that you may have created a masterpiece.

    As far as I'm able to discern on the Internet, no one yet has thought of the idea. I'd certainly like to try.
    As the plum pud is boiled/steamed and brownies are baked, you seem to hit a snag, unless you use some pre-cooked ingredient. I suggest layering. Half a Brownie batter amount on the bottom, slices of plum pudding arranged over it, remaining half of brownie batter on top then baked as you would do normally, adjusting for extra depth so the brownie batter is cooked.


    Talking of chococolate cake, I made a chocolate cake layered with red cherry conserve, stoned and halved canned black cherries, and sandwiched with double cream with a hint of Bailey's Irish cream for christmas. Looked similar to this, though, not as much oozing syrup as this pic



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    Re: A Christmas Question for Englishmen

    Quote Originally Posted by Keeland View Post
    Sorry, Johann, I had to look up camp coffee. Too many generations of degenerate central heating.
    I saw it on sale someplace, I thought it was cough syrup.


  27. #27
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    Re: A Christmas Question for Englishmen

    I've never heard of this, nor never tasted one.

  28. #28
    Is the King of JUB Beachguyj's Avatar
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    Re: A Christmas Question for Englishmen

    Quote Originally Posted by JohannBessler View Post
    Tally-ho, gents! Merry Christmas to you all.

    .
    I think they generally say Happy Christmas instead of Merry.
    In his autumn, before the winter, comes man's last mad surge of youth

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